Surgical Instruments


Surgical Innovation is our Passion

Our partnership with the best suppliers in the United States covers the trauma and orthopaedic lines, including implants, instruments and related sterilization containers. As a major player in its field, Our partners cater to orthopaedic surgeons and all services around their practice.

Types of Surgical Instruments

Most of our surgical instruments can be used for general surgery in a research laboratory setting. Instruments may be roughly categorized by function:

  • Cutting instruments include scissors, surgical blades, knives and scalpels.
  • Grasping or holding instruments include hemostatic forceps and tissue forceps.
  • Retractors, which hold incisions open or hold an organ (or tissue) out of the way, include Gelpi, Weitlaner and US Army style instruments.

In addition to surgical instruments, we have many accessories available, which include all the extras needed for surgery. These include clamps, from large towel clamps to delicate vessel clips and bulldog clamps, drills, sutures, binocular loupes, biopsy punches and more.

 

When you are selecting surgical instruments for a procedure, here are a few key points to consider

  • What procedure are you performing? Published research papers usually indicate which instruments other researchers have used for similar procedures. The correct surgical instrument for a particular procedure makes a difference on the outcome of that technique.
  • What is the size of your subject? An instrument that is perfect for a 200­–300 g rat (about 22–25 cm long) may not be the best choice for a neo-natal mouse of about 15 g (about 1–2.5 cm long).
  • How often will the instrument be used? If you perform more than 100 cuts per day, a pair of titanium scissors or a pair of scissors with tungsten carbide inserts would be worth considering. They stay sharp longer.